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20121101
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Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
to approve same-sex marriage passed by referendum in maine, maryland and washington state. and voters in minnesota rejected a proposed constitutional ban on gay marriage. in massachusetts, a measure to legalize physician-assisted suicide was narrowly defeated. in california, voters decided not to abolish the death penalty. with all the acrimony around the election, many religious leaders called for a new spirit of civility. more than 700 churches held special election day communion services. organizers said they wanted to refocus allegiance to god and work for justice beyond the ballot box. our assessment of the election returns in a few moments. >>> faith-based groups continue to mobilize to help those affected by hurricane sandy. on the east coast, volunteers across the spectrum are serving food, providing shelter and helping with cleanup in a massive relief operation. this week, ny othose forts we hampereby evn mo bad weather. kim lawton has more on the efforts in one new york community. >> a week after sandy, rabbi shneur wolowik of the chabad lubavitch movement is in the devastat
will continue in this election cycle. melissa deckman is professor of political science at washington college in chestertown, maryland. >> if you think about the god gap, so-called "god gap," it's still alive and well this year in american politics, and it's gger than things likehe gender gap, although you often hear more in the media about women's voting and men's voting, so i think religion continues to play a big role in american presidential elections. >> the republicans are hoping for a big turnout from evangelicals, who make up about one quarter of gop voters. in the early days of the campaign, there were questions about whether theological differences would keep evangelicals from supporting a mormon candidate. governor mitt romney's campaign tried to woo them on the basis of shared values. >> people of different faiths, like yours and mine, sometis wonder where we c meet in common purpose, when there are so many differences in creed and theology. surely the answer is that we can meet in service, in shared moral convictions about our nation stemming from a common worldview. >> it seems
in washington, d.c., the interfaith group called affordable housing crucial to fighting poverty. >> people of faith gather in partnership because the biblical vision of shalom, which is often translated in english as wholeness, includes a world in which there is enough for everyone. >>> president obama this week toured areas in new york city still grappling with the aftermath of hurricane sandy. the president met with first responders and victims. faith-based relief groups continue to help with the clean-up. the relief arm of the southern baptist convention says it will provide meals through december. and islamic relief usa announced it will partner with the church of jesus christ of latter day saints, the mormons, to deliver supplies to heavily hit parts of new york and new jersey. >>> there were sharp words exchanged between china and the dalai lama as the number of self-immolations by tibetans grew dramatically. speaking in japan, the dalai lama called for an investigation into the causes behind t immolations and faulted china for seeing buddhism as a threat. china meanwhile once again
exhibit at the national portrait gallery in washington. levertov's work contains many themes about faith and doubt, and draws from her background in judaism and christianity. we spoke about those themes with dana greene, author of new biography called "denise levertov: a poet's life." >> you know levertov believed that she was a pilgrim. she said at the end of her life she wanted to poetry itself which was on pilgrimage and it fits together with her notion of being in exile in some sense. she felt she lived on a borderland. i mean her mother was welsh, her father was as russian hasidic jew that converted to christianity and she was from them i think she got the sense of being in exile, on a borderland, a pilgrim to some other place. the jewish, the hasidic base out of which levertov worked was very profound and really influenced her. after about age 12, she was raised in a christian family but she really rejected all of this and became an announced agnostic. but she was interested in judaism. her father gave her a copy of martin buber's tales of the hasidim and she became very very inter
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)

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